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Statistics - United States

NIOSH Worker Health Chartbook

The Worker Health Chartbook, 2000 presents national and state occupational health data and statistics, graphically describing the burden of our Nation's occupational injuries and illnesses. More than 40 scientists from federal and state agencies collaborated to present health surveillance information in the Chartbook's 172 charts and data tables. The Chartbook has a descriptive focus, presenting data and charts that characterize types of injuries and illnesses by gender, race, industry, and occupation. The Chartbook also provides comprehensive reference materials, including appendices describing the 18 surveillance and statistical systems, and the industry and occupation classification systems.

Fatal/Nonfatal Injury Data

Traumatic Occupational Injury Data - Identifying problems in traumatic injury research, as in much of public health, is driven by surveillance. Surveillance is "the ongoing collection, analysis and interpretation of health data in the process of describing and monitoring a health [injury] event." For occupational safety research, this refers to the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data on injuries, hazards, and exposures for identifying potential risk factors for further research, and for prevention planning and intervention evaluation.

The NIOSH Surveillance Strategic Plan

Tracking Occupational Injuries, Illnesses, and Hazards has been an integral part of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) since its creation by the Occupational Safety and Health Act in 1970. In collaboration with its many partners, NIOSH has established surveillance programs to help describe the magnitude of occupational hazards, diseases, and injuries in the U.S. These surveillance activities have often documented the Nation's progress in reducing the burden of work-related diseases and injuries. They have also identified many old and new problems that require additional research and prevention efforts. Despite these accomplishments, occupational health surveillance in the U.S. remains fragmented, with substantial data gaps.

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Produced by the International Occupational Safety and Health Information Centre (CIS) in collaboration with the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS)
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